9/26/2008

Used Car Buying

Owning a four wheeler have become necessity in today’s motorized world. Every one cannot opt for a new car but can always own ‘Used car’ it is also an added advantage if you have just learnt driving. In this way you can refine your driving as well as build up enough confidence to before investing a substantial amount on new car. There are certain fundamentals that have to be followed before buying a car. Especially if it is a used car you have to be careful and well acquainted before investing. To start with:Budget and selection of a car: (pricing, brand, model)…Before buying a car one should always have a rough estimate about spending plan. This way you can select the cars that falls in your budget and then compare it with other cars of same class..Next thing you have to keep in your mind is ‘what kind of car do I want to buy? Or with which manufactures should I go?’ Decide on buying cars depending on your requirement and in this way selection becomes much easier.Look for hidden pointsHistory: (antecedents, accidents, insurance, and depreciation)…Inspect the chassis of the car thoroughly; the body line will give an idea whether the car was involved in a accident. You can check any sign of repainting, similar color body parts etc…. the insurance formalities like regular premiums are paid, policy is revised etc…Ownership: (antecedents: single owner/multiple owner)It is very important to enquire about its ownership as its been owned by a single or multiple owner and if it is multiple , there will value depreciation depending upon its condition.When inspecting a car always check for mechanical and technical problems. As it’s a pre-owned car, proper overall review is necessary. Start with its engine: that it should idle smoothly with out any sputtering and also accelerate with out any hesitation.Wheel alignment plays a very vital role, uneven wear and tear of tyres-balding on the sides or in the middle-indicate poor alignment. Check for battery condition, heat up the engine to check the air-conditioner efficiency also check with the deforestation, defogger fan, heater…every single detail that will give value for your buy. Another important thing that has to be kept in mind before buying a car is with its titles and credentials. Ensure that all the paper works are in order, because sometimes it is possible that you may be buying a stolen car. Checklists of the important documents are as follows:• RC Book (Registration book/certificate)- Also known as Blue book is issued by the RTO (certain offices of some state does not provide the document in the form of booklet rather it will be a single document –Form 21’) the where it reveals the date and address of registration and the record of the owners vehicle, the engine number, chassis number (the engine and the chassis numbers has to be verified with that shown in the book). An entry in the book also acknowledges how many times the vehicle has been sold, the details of the previous of the previous owner (name and address). The state registration should be verified, as it has to be registered with the same state where you intend to use your car otherwise you have to get it transferred it which is again a cumbersome process with lots of formalities and time consuming.• Tax certificate/book – This document contains details about tax paid. The RTO tax is a lifetime tax that has to pay by the owner (some state collect life time tax and some have annual tax payment) and if the papers are not clear, you will have to bear all the unpaid taxes. Another tax that people often forget or ignore it is the road tax, so ensure that all the papers are clear before finalizing your deal.• Insurance – Another vital document which is mandatory for any transfer by RTO. Premiums are paid on regular basis and it is always better to check the due date and also ensure that the insurance papers are transferred in your name before your buy. Though any of these insurance papers cannot give you a clear picture about the vehicle involved in any accidents but still it’s a assurance towards the ‘safety of the car’• Invoice – Demand for the original invoice as every owners keep original invoice given to them by the car dealers/showrooms. The invoice encloses all the car details (purchase date, year, chassis and engine number) which give an idea about its original prize. The invoice also gives the information if the car is financed or not.• NOC (no objection certificate)- If the car is purchased on finance, ask for its documents from the finance company stating all the dues are paid and the company have no claim on the vehicle any more. Form 35- you must have a copy of this duly signed by the financer.• PUC certificate (pollution under control)- every car needs a PUC certificate and it is valid up to one year for every new car and has to be obtained in every six months.Always do your homework before buying your car in terms of researching. Search for online information about the car your looking for, go for its technical and mechanical details and check for its resale value. In this computer world we can get any information from anyone and from anywhere. Use online quotes that will be a great help, compare cars as well as look for best deals with different dealers. Do a thorough study about your car before buying rather than going for the first car you came across. Instead of hurrying, take your time, look as many as cars you can and have an eye for detailing and then decide for the ‘right car’ you want to own. Once you feel your research is complete and now you are ready to look out for your car, comes the next step.Ratify the value of the vehicleIt is not necessary that everyone is well versed with knowledge about cars. May be to a certain extent but to know a in and out of a used car, a professional opinion is must.It is always better to consult a mechanic or get it rated in authorized service center and if you are dealing with a private party then be always on guard as vehicle sold to you could be stolen. You can also contact the dealers to know about the warranty features and also about the resale value of the car.Exterior CheckCheck for the overall condition of the car like dents, nick, scratch, repaint, working condition of light, tail lamps, indicator, wiper (flick all the switches and check if everything working properly ). Also check the tyres in terms of wear and tear, (if you don’t get a good radial tyre, then try to reduce the prize further ) oil tank for its leakage. It is also very important to check the undercarriage of the car. Check for the shock absorbers, lean hard on the corner of the car and release and if the car is rocking up and down then it may need replacing.Interior checkGo through the warning indicator lights, speedometer, the fuel gauge and the other gauge work properly, also check for the glove box lock is intact. Coming to the seating, look if the headrest, adjustable seats, door handles, window knobs, interior lights, seat belts.Also check for the air-conditioning, ensure that all the A/C switches are working and the proper air flows through all the provided vents. Look for any squeaky noise while opening any window or door. Also ensure that the locking system is perfect. The last thing people look for is the tool kit, but one should make sure all the tools present in the kit. Look for the Once the all the interior and exterior factors are analyzed, now it’s the time to take the car for a ride in a literal meaning.Test driveOne cannot just have a overall look and then decide on buying a car. It is very important to take a test derive so that one will have a clear picture about the car. It is better to take a longer stretch so that the engine is heated up. Once the car is warmed up check if there is any kind of noise or vibration or even any kind of odor and any kind of unusual sound or vibration will be an invitation for a major trouble. Check if the steering wheel is perfect, there should not be any kind of vibration. Test the pressure with the hand breaks as well as with the pedal brakes. Drive it on a empty long stretch with a 30kph and apply hard brakes, the car should come to a stop with in no time with out any pressure or vibration. The pedals should be smooth and applying brakes should not with much effort. Finance factorWork at your payment mode before your venture forth, avoid credit card payment through because of high interest rates. And if you are looking for finance, It is always better to avoid the third party concept in any kind of financing, always go for the direct finance as it will save your time as well as money. Opt for easy-payable EMI with zero interest option(now there are leading banks that provide affordable and easily repayable ‘used car loans’. Clinch the dealSo now as you are well versed and clear with all the technical, mechanical as well as legal details, keep in mind certain important points before finalizing the deal.? Ensure that all the terms and conditions of the deal are obtained in writing: This will give a clear picture to both the parties involved in a deal (previous as well as the current owner). There will be no space for confusion to arise.? Negotiate for a better prize: As it is buyers market you can always have your say in terms of bargaining. Before you go for your car shopping, ensure that your are aware with the value of the car you’re buying and the value of trade in. The seller should get the idea that you are also aware of the car markets; you should be always ready for the bargain-battle.? Know that a well stocked dealer will cut a better dealLast but not the least and the most important factor that has t be taken care after finalizing the deal is :Transferring OwnershipWith the sale of the care, the ownership also changes. The original owner (Transferor), who is selling the car should inform the RTO with whom the car was registered with in 14 days with a letter of information about the new owner (Transferee) and incase the new owner falls into the jurisdiction of another RTO, then the Transferor has to inform the this RTO with the similar letter and receiving an acknowledgment of receipt of the letter from the RTO, the transferor is indemnified of all legal, tax, traffic, criminal and other liabilities pertaining to the car. The seller must also take a delivery note signed by a buyer. And if the car has being transferred is in another state, then the transferor has to get a NOC(no objection certificate, form 28’) from his RTO and forward to the RTO in whose jurisdiction the new owner stays. NOC is accompanied by another set of documents required to transferring ownership as follows:• Form "TCA" - Intimation of transfer by Transferee (buyer) • Form "TCR" - Intimation of transfer by Transferor (seller) • Form No.29 - Notice of transfer of ownership of vehicle. • Form No.30 - Report of transfer of ownership of vehicle. • Valid Insurance policy • PUC Certificate • Address proof of the Transferee (the buyer)

Top Ten Secrets to Get Rid of Your Used Car, But Still Earn What it Worth

In this Article you will find out the top ten secrets to sell your cars for the highest value possible without spending a fortune.


1. Find out How much is your car worth.

There is plenty of cars magazines, newspapers and cars website online that you can use one of them to find how much is your car worth. In state, the bluebook value is a good one. I am pretty sure most other countries has an equivelant book. A good website to find other cars with the same specs as yours & can give you good a feeling of how much its worth is mecarz for used cars.

2. Don't trade it in, but sell it.

Dealerships who allow you to trade in your old car for a newer one usually cut your car value by at least 30%. Don't you believe that 30% is worth your effort in selling your car than trading it in.

3. Ensure that you have your car Registration Document/Certificate.

Your car Registeration Document/Certificate is the best indicator that the car is your & not stolen. If you have lost your car documents, then ensure you retrieve them before you try to sell your car. It will help you gain a better value of your car.

4. Try to sell your car yourself, not through a dealer ship as you will certainly receive more money for it.

A dealership has to ensure that he will make a descent profit out of your car, so for sure he will offer you way less than your car worth. If you are not in a hassle to sell your car & got the time to sell it on your own you will definitely make a better value of your car selling it on your own.

5. Get your car into the finest shape achievable, inside and outside

Give you car a professional cleaning before you even post it for sale. Take care of you tire pressure, oil and screen wash. Remember the look of your car is the first thing the buyer will see. The first impression is very important when trying to sell your car.

6. Advertise your car in the local newspapers, your church, & online.

Try to make a full use of free advertising forums online and your church ads board. A great place to advertise your used cars online for free will be mecarz.com. A lot of countries has some cars specialties magazines which allow you to advertise your car for free as well & they charge a small fee for the magazine buyer. Both of these can be a great free way to increase your car selling chances.


7. Always have an absolute lowest price in mind, and never go below it

You may have to negotiate your price, but never go below the one you had set your mind to.


8. Never allow a mediator.

No matter what the mediator a buyer bring with him say, be careful as he will always try to reduce of your car value. Remember at the end this mediator service is paid by the buyer, why will he consider to be honest to you!!

9. Finally, payment

Cash is always the best option, though bank draft is as good as cash. If you have to accept a check for the price of the car then ensure you don't give the car key yet, till the check is cleared. Always be careful with checks as not all people as honest as your are.


Sorry I know these were 9, but I had skipped one reason that was on my mind when I started writing this article due to a lot of comments and recommendations to drop it by my friend Frank. Though these 9 tips should be enough to help you get the best price out of your car.

Top 10 Reasons to Buy a Used Car Vs a New Car

Buying a used car is a great way to save some money and still get the car you've been searching for. Whether you're constrained by your pocketbook or have certain automotive needs that must be met (such as a backseat for the kids or four-wheel drive for winter weather), today's used car options deliver almost everything new cars do and at a lower overall cost.1. DepreciationThe second you drive a new car off the lot, its value depreciates by as much as 20 percent. Studies show that most cars are only worth 60 to 70 percent of their original value three years after their purchase. When you buy a used car, all the depreciation has already been absorbed by the original owner.2. No Overpriced Dealer RepairsWhen you purchase certain makes and models of new cars, the parts covered under warranty aren't valid if you use your own mechanic. In these instances, your only choice is to return to the dealership to get your repairs done. This is basically the dealership's way of getting you into their shops with their overpriced service. When you buy a used car, you can get repairs done on your own terms.3. Save MoneyBuying used cars whether you are buying from a used car dealership, car classifieds, or online sites like Craigslist simply costs less money than buying new. New cars run an average of $25,000, while used cars are closer to the $10,000 range. If you're buying from a private seller, you might even be able to haggle the price down or barter to keep costs low.4. Save the PlanetWhile buying a hybrid car might seem like a great way to go green, it actually takes more energy to build a new hybrid than it does to buy a fuel-efficient used car. Every time a hybrid comes off the assembly line, it takes about 46,000 miles of driving before the car breaks even? in the amount of energy it saves through fuel efficiency. Buying a used car in the first place as long as it's not a gas guzzler will actually reduce your carbon footprint.5. Lower Car Insurance RatesCar insurance rates are higher for new cars than they are for used cars. The reasons are simple: new cars are more likely to be financed (and therefore need full coverage), and annual insurance rates can run as high as 20 percent of a car's sticker price. Buying a newer, more expensive model can end up costing you money for years.6. Higher Used Car StandardsThanks to new lemon laws and auto history check websites, it has become easier than ever to determine if a used car has undergone any major damage. Some used car dealerships also offer used car certification, which guarantees that they have been looked over and approved by a qualified mechanic.7. Avoiding Car DealershipsWhen buying a used car, you have a number of places to look. You can peruse car classifieds, visit eBay or Craigslist, or opt for a used car dealership. New cars typically only come from one place - the dealer - so you have limited options when it comes to salesmen and haggling over prices.8. Finding Good DealsOwners of new cars can be a pretty finicky set. Many people turn over their cars after one or two years simply as a matter of course, while others may decide that the monthly payments are too high to continue. If you take the time to look for quality used cars, you might find some incredibly good deals from individuals who are motivated to sell.9. More Bang for Your BuckWhen you drive a new car straight off the lot, you typically pay for every added feature. When you upgrade to include a sunroof, tinted windows, and a spoiler, you can leave with a total price thousands of dollars higher than the sticker price. Used cars with these same amenities might cost a little more than those without, but not nearly to the same extent.10. Used Cars can be just as Reliable if carefully inspectedAlthough buying a new car may seem like a more responsible choice, no car purchase is guaranteed to be hassle-free. Factory recalls, faulty parts, and required maintanence repairs can occur just as easily in a new car as they can in a used car. As long as you have your used car purchase checked out and you take good care of it, the overall reliability of your car can be just as good as a new car. Further, cars have also become more reliable with advances in technology.Buying a car - regardless of whether you choose new or used - is a major endeavor that can put a strain on your finances for years. Fortunately, most of the benefits of buying a used car have to do with money. As long as you take your time, evaluate your prospective purchases, and have a mechanic check out the used car before you buy it, you and your used car can spend many happy years together.

Used Cars: "Certified" No Substitute for Extended Warranties

Thinking about a used car? Nervous about what's under the hood? Used car dealers are feeling your pain all the way to the bank. In an ironic twist, "pre-owned vehicle" dealers have found a way to profit from their bad reputation.

No, they're not just selling overpriced used car extended warranties anymore. They're charging a 10%-25% markup on used cars "certified" (by them) not to be pieces of junk. The accompanying "certified" used car warranties in fact usually carry much less protection than the best used car warranties, which you can buy yourself online. Who needs a used car warranty if your jalopy is a "certified" machine?

But even paying 10%-25% more won't eliminate risk. Thorough extended warranties for used cars are necessary, "certified" or not. In some cases, a half-hearted inspection means the certification may not be worth the paper it's written on. Used car problems often only appear months or years after purchase. That's why even for mint used cars, used car extended warranties are essential.

Worse, "certified" used cars don't always come with any extended used car warranty coverage. When a "certified" used car warranty is included, it usually has much less coverage than a new car warranty. Even most standard pre-owned vehicle extended warranties offer much more protection than most "certified" used car warranties.

You can almost always do better on your own. An independent inspection and a used car extended warranty provide better peace of mind, often at a lower price.

"Certified" Used Car Inspections Inspected

The cornerstone of a "certified" used car program is the supposedly super-thorough inspection. There are good reasons to think that the inspection does not replace an independent inspection or used car extended warranty coverage.
Are inspections really added value? Don't you wonder why dealers aren't inspecting all their cars before taking delivery themselves? Car dealers aren't idiots, at least not with cars. Anyone who's had to haggle over a trade-in knows that. The big question is whether the dealership will disclose everything it knows. Trust is still an issue with "certified" cars.

Certified by whom? Think about it: the same people who are trying to sell you the car are also "certifying" it. Yes, you read right: the "certification" is usually done by the dealership selling the car. If there's any manufacturer oversight, it's often just an occasional inspection of the dealer's inspection.

Duplicate inspection. You should have any used car, "certified" or not, thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic. You're up against an industry that demonstrates about as much trustworthiness as, well, used car dealers. Do not give up your first line of defense.

Limits of inspections. No inspection in the world can foresee every possible problem. Oftentimes, something that breaks a few months after purchase really was fine when the car was sold--or was virtually undetectable. When--not if--something gives out, you'd better have a used car extended warranty.
"Certified" Used Car Warranty Coverage under the Hood

The implied selling point of "certified" used cars is they won't break. That kind of makes used car extended warranties seem unnecessary. Naturally, some buyers may wonder what will be happen if something does break anyway. In order to ease those inquiring minds, "certified" used car warranties often come included, or are at least implied. Sadly, too few people will inquire further about what the "certified" used car warranty covers.
Does certified mean "under warranty"? Not necessarily. The major manufacturers' "certified" programs usually include some extended warranty protection. But oftentimes, "certified" cars sold outside of manufacturers' programs do not come with any extended warranty coverage. If it does break, tough luck.

How good's the warranty? The GM Certified Used Vehicle Warranty is only for 3 months or 3,000 miles! Ford offers longer "certified" warranties. But they generally aren't bumper-to-bumper, covering only the "power train." Forget about the little extras like the roof or the doors. Right off the internet, you can buy extended warranty used car coverage that is generally bumper-to-bumper and lasts several years.
"Certified" Used Cars: Extended Warranties Still Needed

"Certified" used cars offer two things: an inspection and a used car extended warranty. Arguably, neither is worth the price.
Inspection. Let's face reality. The junky used car problem doesn't exist for want of dealer inspections. Lemons get sold for one of three reasons. a) The defect did not show up in the dealer's own inspection. b) The dealer is trying to sell a car whose defects were already known. Or sometimes c) the buyer knows about the defects but is guilty of wishful thinking. In none of these cases will a "certified" inspection provide the protection of an independent inspection and extended used car warranty.

Warranty. A "certified" used car will often cost 10%-25% more. For a $10,000 used car, that's $1,000-$2,500. An extended used car warranty from an independent auto warranty company will often cost about the same. But the best used car warranties will provide a lot more protection than "certified" used car warranties. Given that fact, you may end up getting an independent extended car warranty anyway.
Worst of all, certified used cars come with an expensive risk. They tempt you to let your guard down. Ford even issued a press release headlined "Pre-Owned Vehicle Program Reduces Customer Buyer Beware." As if that were a good thing.

Of course, in the end, you may buy a "certified" used car anyway. These days it seems there are fewer and fewer used cars that aren't "certified." Just make sure to get an independent inspection and an independent used car extended warranty. "Certified" or not, it's still a used car.
Thinking about a used car? Nervous about what's under the hood? Used car dealers are feeling your pain all the way to the bank. In an ironic twist, "pre-owned vehicle" dealers have found a way to profit from their bad reputation.

No, they're not just selling overpriced used car extended warranties anymore. They're charging a 10%-25% markup on used cars "certified" (by them) not to be pieces of junk. The accompanying "certified" used car warranties in fact usually carry much less protection than the best used car warranties, which you can buy yourself online. Who needs a used car warranty if your jalopy is a "certified" machine?

But even paying 10%-25% more won't eliminate risk. Thorough extended warranties for used cars are necessary, "certified" or not. In some cases, a half-hearted inspection means the certification may not be worth the paper it's written on. Used car problems often only appear months or years after purchase. That's why even for mint used cars, used car extended warranties are essential.

Worse, "certified" used cars don't always come with any extended used car warranty coverage. When a "certified" used car warranty is included, it usually has much less coverage than a new car warranty. Even most standard pre-owned vehicle extended warranties offer much more protection than most "certified" used car warranties.

You can almost always do better on your own. An independent inspection and a used car extended warranty provide better peace of mind, often at a lower price.

"Certified" Used Car Inspections Inspected

The cornerstone of a "certified" used car program is the supposedly super-thorough inspection. There are good reasons to think that the inspection does not replace an independent inspection or used car extended warranty coverage.
Are inspections really added value? Don't you wonder why dealers aren't inspecting all their cars before taking delivery themselves? Car dealers aren't idiots, at least not with cars. Anyone who's had to haggle over a trade-in knows that. The big question is whether the dealership will disclose everything it knows. Trust is still an issue with "certified" cars.

Certified by whom? Think about it: the same people who are trying to sell you the car are also "certifying" it. Yes, you read right: the "certification" is usually done by the dealership selling the car. If there's any manufacturer oversight, it's often just an occasional inspection of the dealer's inspection.

Duplicate inspection. You should have any used car, "certified" or not, thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic. You're up against an industry that demonstrates about as much trustworthiness as, well, used car dealers. Do not give up your first line of defense.

Limits of inspections. No inspection in the world can foresee every possible problem. Oftentimes, something that breaks a few months after purchase really was fine when the car was sold--or was virtually undetectable. When--not if--something gives out, you'd better have a used car extended warranty.
"Certified" Used Car Warranty Coverage under the Hood

The implied selling point of "certified" used cars is they won't break. That kind of makes used car extended warranties seem unnecessary. Naturally, some buyers may wonder what will be happen if something does break anyway. In order to ease those inquiring minds, "certified" used car warranties often come included, or are at least implied. Sadly, too few people will inquire further about what the "certified" used car warranty covers.
Does certified mean "under warranty"? Not necessarily. The major manufacturers' "certified" programs usually include some extended warranty protection. But oftentimes, "certified" cars sold outside of manufacturers' programs do not come with any extended warranty coverage. If it does break, tough luck.

How good's the warranty? The GM Certified Used Vehicle Warranty is only for 3 months or 3,000 miles! Ford offers longer "certified" warranties. But they generally aren't bumper-to-bumper, covering only the "power train." Forget about the little extras like the roof or the doors. Right off the internet, you can buy extended warranty used car coverage that is generally bumper-to-bumper and lasts several years.
"Certified" Used Cars: Extended Warranties Still Needed

"Certified" used cars offer two things: an inspection and a used car extended warranty. Arguably, neither is worth the price.
Inspection. Let's face reality. The junky used car problem doesn't exist for want of dealer inspections. Lemons get sold for one of three reasons. a) The defect did not show up in the dealer's own inspection. b) The dealer is trying to sell a car whose defects were already known. Or sometimes c) the buyer knows about the defects but is guilty of wishful thinking. In none of these cases will a "certified" inspection provide the protection of an independent inspection and extended used car warranty.

Warranty. A "certified" used car will often cost 10%-25% more. For a $10,000 used car, that's $1,000-$2,500. An extended used car warranty from an independent auto warranty company will often cost about the same. But the best used car warranties will provide a lot more protection than "certified" used car warranties. Given that fact, you may end up getting an independent extended car warranty anyway.
Worst of all, certified used cars come with an expensive risk. They tempt you to let your guard down. Ford even issued a press release headlined "Pre-Owned Vehicle Program Reduces Customer Buyer Beware." As if that were a good thing.

Of course, in the end, you may buy a "certified" used car anyway. These days it seems there are fewer and fewer used cars that aren't "certified." Just make sure to get an independent inspection and an independent used car extended warranty. "Certified" or not, it's still a used car.
Thinking about a used car? Nervous about what's under the hood? Used car dealers are feeling your pain all the way to the bank. In an ironic twist, "pre-owned vehicle" dealers have found a way to profit from their bad reputation.

No, they're not just selling overpriced used car extended warranties anymore. They're charging a 10%-25% markup on used cars "certified" (by them) not to be pieces of junk. The accompanying "certified" used car warranties in fact usually carry much less protection than the best used car warranties, which you can buy yourself online. Who needs a used car warranty if your jalopy is a "certified" machine?

But even paying 10%-25% more won't eliminate risk. Thorough extended warranties for used cars are necessary, "certified" or not. In some cases, a half-hearted inspection means the certification may not be worth the paper it's written on. Used car problems often only appear months or years after purchase. That's why even for mint used cars, used car extended warranties are essential.

Worse, "certified" used cars don't always come with any extended used car warranty coverage. When a "certified" used car warranty is included, it usually has much less coverage than a new car warranty. Even most standard pre-owned vehicle extended warranties offer much more protection than most "certified" used car warranties.

You can almost always do better on your own. An independent inspection and a used car extended warranty provide better peace of mind, often at a lower price.

"Certified" Used Car Inspections Inspected

The cornerstone of a "certified" used car program is the supposedly super-thorough inspection. There are good reasons to think that the inspection does not replace an independent inspection or used car extended warranty coverage.
Are inspections really added value? Don't you wonder why dealers aren't inspecting all their cars before taking delivery themselves? Car dealers aren't idiots, at least not with cars. Anyone who's had to haggle over a trade-in knows that. The big question is whether the dealership will disclose everything it knows. Trust is still an issue with "certified" cars.

Certified by whom? Think about it: the same people who are trying to sell you the car are also "certifying" it. Yes, you read right: the "certification" is usually done by the dealership selling the car. If there's any manufacturer oversight, it's often just an occasional inspection of the dealer's inspection.

Duplicate inspection. You should have any used car, "certified" or not, thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic. You're up against an industry that demonstrates about as much trustworthiness as, well, used car dealers. Do not give up your first line of defense.

Limits of inspections. No inspection in the world can foresee every possible problem. Oftentimes, something that breaks a few months after purchase really was fine when the car was sold--or was virtually undetectable. When--not if--something gives out, you'd better have a used car extended warranty.
"Certified" Used Car Warranty Coverage under the Hood

The implied selling point of "certified" used cars is they won't break. That kind of makes used car extended warranties seem unnecessary. Naturally, some buyers may wonder what will be happen if something does break anyway. In order to ease those inquiring minds, "certified" used car warranties often come included, or are at least implied. Sadly, too few people will inquire further about what the "certified" used car warranty covers.
Does certified mean "under warranty"? Not necessarily. The major manufacturers' "certified" programs usually include some extended warranty protection. But oftentimes, "certified" cars sold outside of manufacturers' programs do not come with any extended warranty coverage. If it does break, tough luck.

How good's the warranty? The GM Certified Used Vehicle Warranty is only for 3 months or 3,000 miles! Ford offers longer "certified" warranties. But they generally aren't bumper-to-bumper, covering only the "power train." Forget about the little extras like the roof or the doors. Right off the internet, you can buy extended warranty used car coverage that is generally bumper-to-bumper and lasts several years.
"Certified" Used Cars: Extended Warranties Still Needed

"Certified" used cars offer two things: an inspection and a used car extended warranty. Arguably, neither is worth the price.
Inspection. Let's face reality. The junky used car problem doesn't exist for want of dealer inspections. Lemons get sold for one of three reasons. a) The defect did not show up in the dealer's own inspection. b) The dealer is trying to sell a car whose defects were already known. Or sometimes c) the buyer knows about the defects but is guilty of wishful thinking. In none of these cases will a "certified" inspection provide the protection of an independent inspection and extended used car warranty.

Warranty. A "certified" used car will often cost 10%-25% more. For a $10,000 used car, that's $1,000-$2,500. An extended used car warranty from an independent auto warranty company will often cost about the same. But the best used car warranties will provide a lot more protection than "certified" used car warranties. Given that fact, you may end up getting an independent extended car warranty anyway.
Worst of all, certified used cars come with an expensive risk. They tempt you to let your guard down. Ford even issued a press release headlined "Pre-Owned Vehicle Program Reduces Customer Buyer Beware." As if that were a good thing.

Of course, in the end, you may buy a "certified" used car anyway. These days it seems there are fewer and fewer used cars that aren't "certified." Just make sure to get an independent inspection and an independent used car extended warranty. "Certified" or not, it's still a used car.
Thinking about a used car? Nervous about what's under the hood? Used car dealers are feeling your pain all the way to the bank. In an ironic twist, "pre-owned vehicle" dealers have found a way to profit from their bad reputation.

No, they're not just selling overpriced used car extended warranties anymore. They're charging a 10%-25% markup on used cars "certified" (by them) not to be pieces of junk. The accompanying "certified" used car warranties in fact usually carry much less protection than the best used car warranties, which you can buy yourself online. Who needs a used car warranty if your jalopy is a "certified" machine?

But even paying 10%-25% more won't eliminate risk. Thorough extended warranties for used cars are necessary, "certified" or not. In some cases, a half-hearted inspection means the certification may not be worth the paper it's written on. Used car problems often only appear months or years after purchase. That's why even for mint used cars, used car extended warranties are essential.

Worse, "certified" used cars don't always come with any extended used car warranty coverage. When a "certified" used car warranty is included, it usually has much less coverage than a new car warranty. Even most standard pre-owned vehicle extended warranties offer much more protection than most "certified" used car warranties.

You can almost always do better on your own. An independent inspection and a used car extended warranty provide better peace of mind, often at a lower price.

"Certified" Used Car Inspections Inspected

The cornerstone of a "certified" used car program is the supposedly super-thorough inspection. There are good reasons to think that the inspection does not replace an independent inspection or used car extended warranty coverage.
Are inspections really added value? Don't you wonder why dealers aren't inspecting all their cars before taking delivery themselves? Car dealers aren't idiots, at least not with cars. Anyone who's had to haggle over a trade-in knows that. The big question is whether the dealership will disclose everything it knows. Trust is still an issue with "certified" cars.

Certified by whom? Think about it: the same people who are trying to sell you the car are also "certifying" it. Yes, you read right: the "certification" is usually done by the dealership selling the car. If there's any manufacturer oversight, it's often just an occasional inspection of the dealer's inspection.

Duplicate inspection. You should have any used car, "certified" or not, thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic. You're up against an industry that demonstrates about as much trustworthiness as, well, used car dealers. Do not give up your first line of defense.

Limits of inspections. No inspection in the world can foresee every possible problem. Oftentimes, something that breaks a few months after purchase really was fine when the car was sold--or was virtually undetectable. When--not if--something gives out, you'd better have a used car extended warranty.
"Certified" Used Car Warranty Coverage under the Hood

The implied selling point of "certified" used cars is they won't break. That kind of makes used car extended warranties seem unnecessary. Naturally, some buyers may wonder what will be happen if something does break anyway. In order to ease those inquiring minds, "certified" used car warranties often come included, or are at least implied. Sadly, too few people will inquire further about what the "certified" used car warranty covers.
Does certified mean "under warranty"? Not necessarily. The major manufacturers' "certified" programs usually include some extended warranty protection. But oftentimes, "certified" cars sold outside of manufacturers' programs do not come with any extended warranty coverage. If it does break, tough luck.

How good's the warranty? The GM Certified Used Vehicle Warranty is only for 3 months or 3,000 miles! Ford offers longer "certified" warranties. But they generally aren't bumper-to-bumper, covering only the "power train." Forget about the little extras like the roof or the doors. Right off the internet, you can buy extended warranty used car coverage that is generally bumper-to-bumper and lasts several years.
"Certified" Used Cars: Extended Warranties Still Needed

"Certified" used cars offer two things: an inspection and a used car extended warranty. Arguably, neither is worth the price.
Inspection. Let's face reality. The junky used car problem doesn't exist for want of dealer inspections. Lemons get sold for one of three reasons. a) The defect did not show up in the dealer's own inspection. b) The dealer is trying to sell a car whose defects were already known. Or sometimes c) the buyer knows about the defects but is guilty of wishful thinking. In none of these cases will a "certified" inspection provide the protection of an independent inspection and extended used car warranty.

Warranty. A "certified" used car will often cost 10%-25% more. For a $10,000 used car, that's $1,000-$2,500. An extended used car warranty from an independent auto warranty company will often cost about the same. But the best used car warranties will provide a lot more protection than "certified" used car warranties. Given that fact, you may end up getting an independent extended car warranty anyway.
Worst of all, certified used cars come with an expensive risk. They tempt you to let your guard down. Ford even issued a press release headlined "Pre-Owned Vehicle Program Reduces Customer Buyer Beware." As if that were a good thing.

Of course, in the end, you may buy a "certified" used car anyway. These days it seems there are fewer and fewer used cars that aren't "certified." Just make sure to get an independent inspection and an independent used car extended warranty. "Certified" or not, it's still a used car.

Bad Credit Car Loan Refinance

A bad credit car loan refinance program provides the opportunity for an individual to receive better interest rates and a lower payment on a current vehicle. This type of service could be available to a car owner that has a vehicle that is worth more than the remaining balance owed, or if it has already been bought outright. To refinance means to finance again. Bad credit auto loans refinance funds pay off the original lender and begin a new term with a new payment amount. Typically, a program of this nature will have a higher interest rate than a program for the individual in good financial standing, but a lower interest rate than the original agreement. There are no restrictions on the number of times a person can apply for this type of service.

Some borrowers make applications yearly in hopes to find the best rates. As long as the automobile holds its value; a lender will more than likely approve the loan. Bad credit auto loans refinance programs are limited to cars that are either; newer, extremely expensive, or considered classics. Older cars with higher mileage do not keep their value and therefore would not qualify for a bad credit car loans refinance program. The car is pledged as security, and is therefore the leading factor in whether or not approval is achieved. If the borrower's financial score is too low (lower than 550); they may be ineligible to apply.

It is important for the borrower to know what a FICO score is before applying, as there is usually a non-refundable application fee. The FICO score can be checked by obtaining copies of a borrower's financial report from all three nationally recognized reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Once the report is obtained, experts recommend reviewing it for inaccuracies. Inaccuracies make up 25% of lowered scores. Typical inaccuracies that will lower a financial score and render a bad credit auto loan refinance applicant ineligible include: incorrect balances on credit cards, incorrect employment information, and unauthorized credit report inquiries, and incorrect accounts belonging to someone else.

Travelling With Kids in the Car


Pack enough snacks, sandwiches and water to last the entire trip. It is amazing how the time flies when children are eating.
Pack a roll of toilet paper or enough wipes just in case a side of the road stop is necessary.
Bring nappy bags just in case you find out if your child/ren get car sickness.
Pack a bag of your child’s favourite toys. Preferably not hard objects just in case they throw them (speaking from experience here).
Baby Car Organisesr are great so you don’t have to keep reaching behind you to get things. Like this one or this one.
Portable DVD player is essential (remembering spare batteries). Multiple units if there is more than one child or you can get the ones with multiple screens.
Portable game consoles for older children.
Selection of your child’s favourite music to sign along too. Either on the car’s audio system or an individual audio system with headphones.
Arrange the car trip around the child’s nap time.
Break up the car travel in a day. Don’t try to do a 10 hour stint with child/ren in the car.
Everyone’s favourite driving game - Eye Spy with my little eye, something beginning with...
Apply sun-cream to your children’s faces, arms & legs. Sunshades on the windows if you have them.
And most of all - start the day happy and open minded because you don’t know what that car trip will finish up like when you have kids in the car.

Get a New Car Loan

A car loan is simply a way for you to go about paying for the car that you are looking to purchase. You are going to take out a car loan from a financial lending company and bring it to the car dealership with you. The reason for going about doing this is because the moment that you bring your own New Car Finance to a car dealership you are then considered what is known as any cash buyer in that you can buy the car pretty much out right from them just as if you are paying for it in cash in the first place. You can then you should car finance in order to either buy the car that you want from them or you can also use it to lease a car through them.

When you go about getting yourself a great deal on the type of used cars that is going to last you for a long period of time you might end up thinking that it's something that is based upon a roll of the dice or something to that extent. The reality is however that it really depends on each exact amount of time and research that you are willing to put in to in order to empower yourself with the knowledge that is required in order to get the best possible deal on a New Car Loan that you can get for yourself. The bad credit used car loan that you will end up getting for yourself really is going to end up helping you get a very easy to manage and budget priced because the monthly payments are going to be fairly lower than at what you would normally expect from a car dealership as well as the interest rates on it should also be considerably lower than what you would get from used car dealerships. The reason you and make sure that you do this actually correctly is because you not want to end up having to get locked in to why it is known as an upside down car loan. This is aware you end up having your New Car Loan being worth more than what the price on a used car but you are trying to purchase or are purchasing it is. You should not be afraid about this though because there are a few different things you can do that can guide you in finding yourself the best financial deal on a bad credit used car loan.